National Wildlife Health Center

...advancing wildlife and ecosystem health

White-Nose Syndrome Photo Gallery



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NWHC wildlife pathologist Nancy Thomas performs a necropsy on a bat suspected of having White-Nose Syndrome.
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NWHC wildlife pathologist Nancy Thomas and technician Dottie Johnson perform a necropsy on a bat at the USGS National Wildlife Health Center in Madison, WI.
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A bat with white-nose syndrome (WNS) undergoing a necropsy to help identify its cause of death.
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Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department bat biologist Scott Darling, outside a Vermont cave containing affected bats.
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Cluster of little brown bats in crevice outside an affected cave in Vermont.
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Dead bats at a cave entrance in Vermont.
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Biologist entering the entrance of a cave containing bats with white-nose syndrome in Vermont.
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Bat clusters near the entrance of a Vermont cave.
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Biologist navigating large rocks inside a Vermont cave.
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Hibernating bats on wall of a cave in Vermont.
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Little brown bat with wing damage in Vermont.
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Close up of wing damage on a Little Brown bat in Vermont.
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Hibernating bats in a Vermont cave.
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Close up of hibernating bats in a Vermont cave.
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Dead bats on the ground in a Vermont cave.
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Bats in torpor with water droplets on their fur (condensation on the bats indicates that they are at ambient temperature; they have lowered their body temperature down about even with cave temperature).
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Biologists and technicians preparing to enter a New York mine containing bats with WNS.
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Fungal covered items in NY mine (likely scat).
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Entrance to mine in MA containing affected bats.
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USFWS and MA Division of F&W biologists in MA mine containing bats with WNS.
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Close up of water droplet covered hibernating bat in MA mine.
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Affected WNS bats in MA mine.
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Dr. David Blehert working in his laboratory at the USGS National Wildlife Health Center.
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A little brown bat found in a New York cave exhibits fungal growth on its muzzle, ears and wings. Photo by Al Hicks, NY Dept of Environ. Conservation.
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Little brown bat with fungus on muzzle. Photo by Al Hicks, NY Dept of Environ. Conservation.
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Little brown bats in NY hibernation cave. Most of the bats exhibit fungal growth on their muzzles. Photo by Nancy Heaslip, NY Dept of Environ. Conservation.
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Little brown bats in NY cave. Photo by Al Hicks, NY Dept of Environ. Conservation.
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Scientists enter abandoned mine where bats hibernate in NY.
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USGS wildlife disease specialist Kim Miller outside of an abandoned mine where bats hibernate in NY.
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USGS wildlife disease specialist Kim Miller collecting environmental samples in an abandoned mine where bats hibernate in NY.
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USGS scientists conducting necropsy on bats (Doug Berndt, left, Dr. David Blehert, right) at the USGS National Wildlife Health Center.

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Page Last Modified: May 21, 2013